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Assertive and Visible Goodness–in Rural Haiti

by Lon Fendall

The first time I heard this phrase was in a Good News Associates meeting recently.  The GNA director, Jan Wood, used the phrase in response to my report about being involved with some projects in rural Haiti.  Jan said something to the effect of, “Whatever you help with in Haiti, make sure it results in “assertive and visible goodness.”  I said I agreed with that goal, but then later wondered if I even understood what the phrase meant in that context.

The next day while the GNA Associates were talking about something entirely different, Jan said we needed to be sure we as followers of Christ set our eyes on assertive and visible goodness.  Again, that seemed like a good outcome, but I still wondered what Jan might have meant by it.  So I asked her later if she had gotten the phrase from someone else or if she coined it herself.  It was the latter, she said.  She is a person who prays a lot and in the process hears a lot back from God, so I set about to think about the phrase as an important outcome of a proposed project in Southern Haiti. Continue reading

Our Personal Accreditation Standards

by Lon Fendall

ftc-graduationA major part of my ministry is to support the Friends theological colleges in Kenya and Rwanda.  I just returned from another visit to Friends Theological College (FTC) in Kaimosi, Kenya where I have been an academic consultant for them in their accreditation process.     The process is not fun’ it is a lot of work, especially when it is the first time around.  My work is to clarify what needs to be done and when those tasks need to be completed.  Then I will help with the final editing.

During this last stay, I began thinking about the parallels between accreditation in colleges and universities and the accountability each of us needs to take seriously in our personal spiritual development.  Although there are 30 standards established by the Association for Christian Theological Education in Africa (ACTEA), I was drawn to the five under “administration.”

Imagine that we were being evaluated by a group of visiting angels and their only question was, “Are you meeting each of these five standards?” Continue reading

Non-Traditional and Entrepreneurial Ministries by Jay Marshall

Barley Before accepting the role of dean of Earlham School of Religion (ESR), I served as a Friends pastor for fifteen years. Someone once asked me if I ever regretted leaving the ministry. I responded that I never once thought that I had. The form may have changed, but the call endures. That comment lingers with me as a reminder that a narrow view of ministry persists in the minds of some.

There are a multitude of ways to serve God in this world. One of the delights of position as dean at a Quaker seminary is the opportunity to explore new possibilities when traditional categories are clearly not sufficient. Ours is a very inclusive definition of ministry and I hope this welcoming spirit will continue as new students join us. Anything to which God calls an individual and for which the Spirit equips the individual should aptly be described as one’s ministry. When such leadings are followed, the path frequently leads to non-traditional, or even entrepreneurial, forms of ministries. It is a wonderful strategy by which God’s work permeates the neighborhood, far wider than traditional meeting or church ministries are prone to reach. And, in an era when the so called NONES, DONES, and others seek meaningful engagement and spiritual fulfillment in unusual places, we should expect and even hope this trend continues. For ESR graduates, it happens with some frequency.

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Giving Mark a Well-Deserved Break

Mark 2007Mark Oppenlander is a multi-talented and versatile individual , whom I consider to be a special friend. His recent SEEDS article reflected on seventeen years of involvement with Good News Associates (GNA), starting with the discussion at Jan Wood’s dining room table about the shape this ministry would take. Mark reviewed his various roles with GNA during those years, including Secretary, Treasurer, and President of the Board (not all at once). He made it clear that he is still a strong supporter of GNA and would continue to follow its work closely. Since he is the son-in-law of the GNA Director, Jan Wood, it won’t be hard for him to stay in touch.

During the last ten years of Mark’s volunteer work with GNA (his “day job” is at Seattle Pacific University), he has been the first and only editor of SEEDS, a monthly publication posted on the GNA web site (Goodnewsassoc.org). In his article, Mark spoke about taking a break from GNA work and made it clear that he also wanted a break from editing SEEDS. Linked to the board decision accepting Mark’s request was its action inviting me to be the next editor of SEEDS. More about that in a minute. Continue reading

An Encounter with an Alien Presence

Feature-AlienEncounterby Lon Fendall

My awareness of an alien taking up residence inside my body didn’t happen all at once, which was probably a good thing. No, I’m not talking about the plot of a science fiction story. This alien is the real thing. And coming to the point of accepting and dealing with the uninvited and completely unwelcome presence in my body was a gradual process and not at all as dramatic as a science fiction movie or novel.

The first hint of the alien’s presence was the troubled look on the face of the Physician Assistant who had treated me several times for a UTI (urinary tract infection). He wanted to know if the most recent antibiotic he had prescribed had helped get rid of the symptoms. “Not particularly, they’re still there,” I said, not realizing what this might mean. The PA went on to explain why he was troubled. “That antibiotic you have been taking is one of the strongest there is and if this were only an infection, the symptoms would be gone by now. We have to get you scheduled for some tests and you need to be seen by a urologist. This is beyond my capacity to treat.” Continue reading